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Peanut Trivia/Fast Facts
  • There are over 700 known phobias. Archibutyrophobia (pronounced A’-ra-kid-bu-ti-ro-pho-bi-a) is the fear of getting peanut butter stuck to the roof of your mouth.
  • A nutty thing about peanuts is that they’re not a nut, but a legume, a member of the pea and bean family. Like all nuts, peanuts are rich sources of food energy and like legumes they’re a super source of
  • Rumor says that there’s enough mental stimulation in one peanut to produce 30 minutes of serious thinking. That may or may not be true, but peanuts are a good source of protein and the B vitamins, nutrients that help prevent “brain fatigue”
  • The peanut (hypogaea arachis) is a legume, related to beans and peas. The plant has a small, but pretty yellow (lower. After pollination, the flower wilts, a spike projects into the ground, on which the peanut develops. Because the peanuts actually are formed under the ground, they are sometimes called "ground nuts" or "ground peas."
  • Peanut butter/peanut paste is the leading use of peanuts produced in the U.S. (1/2); followed by snack nuts and in-shells (1/4); and, candy and confections (1/4).
  • Peanuts are the #1 snack nut consumed in the U.S. Accounting for 2/3's of the snack nut market.
  • Five of the top 10 selling candy bars in the U.S. contain peanuts or peanut butter.
  • Peanut oil is valued as premium cooking oil by cooks and chefs worldwide. Tasteless and odorless, peanut oil doesn't transfer food flavors, has a very high smoke point (440 to 470† F.) and is high in the desirable mono-unsaturated fatty acids.
  • Specially processed defatted peanuts may be ground into a flour for use in making high protein foods and beverages-, may be granulated and added to breakfast or diet bars to raise the protein levels; or may be flavored to taste like other foods.
  • One of the many great advantages of peanuts and peanut butter is long shelf life. If held at average ambient temperature without great change in heat or humidity, peanuts and peanut butter can be safely stored for several months.
  • Dr. George Washington Carver, research scientist at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama , found over 300 uses for the peanut plant in the early 1900's. He has been called the "peanut wizard" and the "father of the modem peanut industry."
  • Peanuts contain no cholesterol. Recent studies show that the combination of monounsaturates and polyunsaturates such as are found in peanuts may be helpful in reducing cholesterol levels in the body.
  • Peanut butter may have been America 's first "health" food. It was concocted in 1890 by a St. Louis physician who was seeking a nutritious, easy-to-digest, high protein food for some of his patients.
  • There are over 700 known phobias. Arachibutyrophobia (pronounced a-ra-kid-bu-ti-ro-pho-bi-a) is the fear of getting peanut butter stuck to the roof of your mouth.
  • Rumor says that there's enough mental stimulation in one peanut to produce 30 minutes of serious thinking. That may or may not be true, but peanuts are a good source of protein and the B vitamins, nutrients that help prevent "brain fatigue."
  • Allen B. Sheppard, Commander of Apollo 14, took a peanut wrapped in foil. tucked it inside his flight suit and away they went to the moon and back. Thereby making that peanut an "Astro Nut."
  • Everybody loves peanuts; so much so, that there's a saying: "Will power is the ability to eat one peanut!"
  • Former President Bill Clinton confessed that one of his favorite sandwiches is peanut butter and banana; also reported to have been the favorite of Elvis "the King" Presley.
  • In Barbara Mandrell's hit song "I Was Country When Country Wasn't Cool" she sings about putting peanuts in her bottle of Coke. (This method of enjoying peanuts was developed by southern farm workers as a practical snack solution in the interest of time and cleanliness, plus it's flavorful.)
  • There are six cities in the U.S. named Peanut: Peanut, CA; Lower Peanut, PA; Upper Peanut, PA; Peanut, PA, Peanut, TN; and Peanut WV.
  • It takes about 540 peanuts to make a 12 ounce jar of peanut butter.
  • "Boiled peanuts" are considered a delicacy in the peanut growing areas of the South. Freshly harvested peanuts are boiled in supersaturated salt water until they are of a soft bean like texture. They are most frequently enjoyed at the end of the day with a favorite beverage.
  • Peanut butter was the secret behind "Mr. Ed," TV's talking horse. Spreading peanut butter inside the horse's mouth created a natural talking movement every time the animal moved his sticky jaws.
  • From the peanuts produced on one acre you can make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. An 18 ounce jar is the most popular size of peanut butter.
  •   Peanut World Records:

- Earl Adkins, Enfield , North Carolina , holds the record for growing the largest peanut - 4 inches long! (The average length of a peanut is about one inch.)

- In August 1976, Tom Miller, a University of Colorado student, pushed a peanut to the top of Pike's Peak with his nose(14,100 feet!). It took him 4 days, 23 hours,47 minutes and 3 seconds.

- April 3, 1973, Chris Ambrose, Clerkenwell, London , ate 100 peanuts singly in 59.2 seconds!

  • Famous peanut farmers:

- Before becoming President of the United States , Jimmy Carter was a peanut farmer in Plains, Georgia .

- Baseball Hall of Fame's, Jim "Catfish" Hunter and Gaylord Perry are peanut farmers from North Carolina (Hunter from Hertford and Perry from Williamston).

There are over 700 known phobias. Archibutyrophobia (pronounced A’-ra-kid-bu-ti-ro-pho-bi-a) is the fear of getting peanut butter stuck to the roof of your mouth.

A nutty thing about peanuts is that they’re not a nut, but a legume, a member of the pea and bean family. Like all nuts, peanuts are rich sources of food energy and like legumes they’re a super source of protein.

Rumor says that there’s enough mental stimulation in one peanut to produce 30 minutes of serious thinking. That may or may not be true, but peanuts are a good source of protein and the B vitamins, nutrients that help prevent “brain fatigue”. 

The Guiness Book of World Records reports that on April 3, 1973, Chris Ambrose, Clerkenwell, London, ate 100 peanuts singly in 59.2 seconds! 

In August 1972, Tom Miller, a University of Colorado student, pushed a peanut to the top of Pikes Peak with his nose (14,100 feet!). It took him 4 days, 23 hours, 47 minutes and 3 seconds. 

According to the Guiness Book of World Records, Earl Adkins, Enfield, North Carolina holds the record for growing the largest peanut – 4 inches long! 

Peanuts probably first grew in Peru. It is thought that early explorers and traders carried peanuts with them to Africa and Asia. Peanuts first came to North America from Africa in Colonial Days. 

Allen B. Sheppard, Commander of Apollo 14, took a peanut wrapped in foil, tucked it inside his flight suit and away they went to the moon and back. Thereby making that peanut an “Astro Nut” – that peanut is now worth more than one million dollars. 

George Washington Carver developed over 300 food and industrial products from peanuts. Among these were mayonnaise, cheese, chili sauce, shampoo, bleach, axle grease, linoleum, metal polish, wood stains, adhesives and plastic. From chemical breakdowns of the peanut, he made milk, ink, dyes, shoe polish, creosote, salve, shaving cream, soap and several kinds of peanut butter. 

Peanut butter may have been America’s first “health” food. It was concocted in 1890 by a St. Louis physician who was seeking a nutritious, easy-to-digest, high protein food for some of his patients.

Last Updated ( Mar 21, 2012 at 04:08 PM )